Monday, February 18, 2008

All in a day's work.


This is my laptop screen. Lots of icons, I know. Today I provided closed captioning services for a deaf patient at Mayo Clinic, a Mong girl in her twenties. I went to her appointment with her and took down in realtime what the nurses and doctor said so that she could read it on my screen. Her parents were present as well; and they didn't speak English, so there was a telephone interpreter for them. It was quite a confusing room for a while until we all got into a groove! It was kind of awkward and stressful, all of us in a tiny room, the doctor poking and prodding the patient on the exam table, me squished in between her mom, dad, and sister so that I could be near her with my equipment. I love it. I get such a thrill from being someone's ears for them, writing words like neurofibromatosis and watching them translate into English in a split second on my screen. I will be accompanying this particular client to her appointments all week and am already looking forward to seeing her again tomorrow morning, helping her to engage in a conversation that, without modern technology, she wouldn't otherwise be able to have.

4 comments:

martha said...

That is really cool. I would have never known that.

Katie said...

I feel a little dumb asking this question, but does she speak English, or is short hand kind of come in one language? I know sign language is different in different languages because of different grammar.

Betsy Cradic said...

I write everything on my little stenography machine, and my computer software then translates it into English within seconds. She could read English, but her parents could not. They had to have an interpreter, and then I would write what the interpreter said. I know it's kind of confusing unless you can see the setup. :)

Abbi said...

That sounds a little chaotic but neat. I think I would prefer doing that than your visits to the jail.